LFW Mourning  #MeToo

LFW Mourning #MeToo

#MeToo is about female solidarity. But it’s also about grieving. Since the movement exploded in 2017, it’s single message has sparked global conversation - that sexual violence must end. Yet, until it does, we will continue to mourn.

 Erdem

Erdem

 Richard Quinn

Richard Quinn

Maybe that’s why Mary Katrantzou, Simone Rocha and Erdem, (among many others), all sombrely sent black mesh veils down the runway this fashion week.

Marc Jacobs paired loose silhouettes with funereal headdresses of birdcage netting. At Erdem, Moralioglu & Joesph sent veiled models in structured tailoring and monochrome florals down their Victoriana runway. Masked faces enhanced a theme of anonymity, a disregard for identification. Because #MeToo is defined by its empowering honesty; like mesh - it’s intimate, but it’s transparent. The voices of this movement represent a single identity that unites us all. Fashion week’s concealed faces were testament to the anonymity of the individual in an empowered global community.

Richard Quinn took anonymity to the next level. Think American Horror Story’s Rubber Man meets Dior’s 1947 New Look. Spandex morph suit under satin sloping shoulders, bustles and bows. All black, because this is sexy taken seriously. A tribute to boundary pushing style, (also see Gareth Pugh’s red & black bondage), Quinn’s anonymous line up broke moulds. It’s dark, it’s twisted, it’s morbid. But it’s also a provocative, sexy and empowering physical barrier. It’s saying that you have no right to determine who I am, but you don’t need to, because we’re the same. Identity is irrelevant.

How Hedi Slimane is sticking to his signature style, and why that’s quite possibly genius.

How Hedi Slimane is sticking to his signature style, and why that’s quite possibly genius.